Sunday, June 29, 2008

Probiotics - The Good Bacteria

PROBIOTICS - The Good Bacteria - Does your pet have digestion problems, diarrhea, skin problems, food intolerances, or other chronic health problems? Supplement with a high quality pet probiotic to restore your pet’s healthy gut, and chances are you’ll improve your pet’s health.
A probiotic, sometimes referred to as good or friendly bacteria, is a microorganism necessary for a healthy and balanced intestinal tract. There are two types of bacteria found in the intestinal tract, good and harmful bacteria. Good bacteria, or probiotics, ensure good health as they are absolutely vital to help:
1. Produce natural antibiotics, which can fight harmful bactera.
2. Regulate and increase hormone levels.
3. Manufacture B group vitamins, biotin and folic acid.
4. Stimulate the immune system.
5. Reduce food intolerance.
6. Increase energy levels.
7. Inhibit the growth of some yeast.
8. Absorb nutrients, antioxidants and iron from food that is
9. Reduce inflammation.
10. Increase digestibility of food.
Several things can destroy the intestinal bacterial balance in a pet’s gut. Overuse of antibiotics destroys good bacteria as well as bad. Moreover, stress, poor diet, pollutants, environmental changes, and prescription drugs can also deplete beneficial bacteria.
Other culprits of good bacteria include chemical fertilizers, pesticides, and soil sterilizers in agriculture which damage the soil ecosystem and the natural flow of bacteria found in the food chain. These chemicals, as well as chemicals in the water supply, reduce the good bacteria in the gut. This allows harmful bacteria to multiply and produce large amounts of toxins and carcinogenic agents. These toxins inhibit the normal function of the digestive system and increase the demands placed on the liver and kidneys. Consequently, this speeds up the aging process and leads to various diseases and digestion problems.
Pets with large amounts of beneficial bacteria are better equipped to fight the growth of unhealthy organisms. So, if pets are to maintain a healthy body, they need large quantities of friendly bacteria. Supplement a well-balanced diet with a high quality pet probiotic and give your pet the health that he most certainly deserves.

Sunday, June 22, 2008

Natural Approaches to Dealing With Pesky Fleas

Problems with Commercial Flea Killers & Traditional

Flea Bite Treatments

***Chemicals that act as poisons are strong enough to

kill fleas, but the long term effects on pets are

unknown, although they are probably not safe to

use. (Employees manufacturing these products must

wear protective clothing and use respirators.

Plus, the product labels warn against skin contact.

So,if the chemicals are potentially harmful to

humans,they are probably not the most healthy

product for pets. )

***Prednisone & other corticosteroid drugs used to

give relief from flea bites help to stop itching &

inflammation. But, they also suppress a pet's

immune system and have possible long-term side

effects: water retention, liver or thyroid damage,

hypertension, obesity, & heart attack.

Healthy Alternatives

***Strengthen your pet's immune system:

Eliminate food allergens from the diet, and

supplement the diet with a well-balanced

essential fatty acid (EFA), probiotics (bifidus

& acidophilus) & digestive enzyme supplements.

EFAs help to make your pet less attractive to

fleas, and digestive supplements carry nutrients

throughout the body & help to breakdown & remove

waste materials that may lead to food allergies.


-Add a pinch of garlic powder to food.

-Add apple cider vinegar to your pet's water.

-Sprinkle 1/2 teaspoon dried Nettle onto your

pet's food (helps to reduce allergic response).

-Add to food or squirt into pet's mouth a low-

alcohol liquid tincture of Dandelion Root,

Burdock Root, or Red Clover (helps eliminate

wastes & supports immune system).

-For severe flea bite allergies (red, inflamed,

itchy skin), licorice serves as an anti-

infammatory. Also, an aloe juice can help to

heal & to relieve itching. Directions: Add

one cup aloe juice to 4 parts water. Pour the

cool liquid onto affected areas of your pet's


***Environment Treatment

Since fleas spend 80% of their time in the

pet's environment, not on the pet, apply herbal

products to your pet's environmental areas

(bedding, etc.). Look for products that contain

extracts and/or oils of eucalyptus, citronella,

juniper, cedar, citrus oil, or Canadian fleabane.

(Citrus oil & Canadian fleabane contain d-

Limonine which can kill fleas.)


Bathe with a good, mild herbal pet shampoo

formulated to bring relief and remove fleas and

body wastes from the skin.

Only use shampoos meant for pets, not humans.

(Human shampoos are often too harsh and may

contain allergens that worsen a pet's allergic


Also, don't shampoo too often or irritation &

dryness may occur.

Friday, June 20, 2008

Seizures in Pets

Witnessing your precious dog or cat having a seizure can be a most frightening experience. During seizures pets often lose control, fall over, chomp their teeth, salivate or drool, whine, paddle with their feet, and begin to urinate or deficate on themselves. Their eyes become large (dilated) and unresponsive. A pet caregiver feels panicked and helpless while watching it all happen.

Hopefully, you and your pet have never, and will never, have to experience this shocking event. But, if you have, or if you experience it in the future, this article will help you to understand what causes seizures, what you can do while your pet is having a seizure, and the various treatment options available.

What causes seizures? Epilepsy is one cause. Certain dog breeds are more susceptible to epilepsy. These include: cocker spaniels; poodles; collies; german shepherds; irish setters; golden retrievers; dachshunds, labrador retrievers, saint bernards, miniature schnauzers, siberian huskies, and wire-haired terriers. Veterinarians are not sure what causes this “hereditary” epilepsy.

In cats hereditary epilepsy is unusual. Vets can normally find the cause of seizures. These include chemical toxins (which includes chemical preservatives used in many pet foods), brain tumors, feline leukemia, feline infections, peritonitis, feline AIDS, head trauma, and problems with the liver and kidneys.

In dogs there are many causes of seizures besides hereditary epilepsy. Allergies to food and the chemicals, preservatives, and artificial flavors put into the foods can cause seizures. Other causes include liver and kidney disease, tumors, poisonings, and low blood sugars.

What can you do while your pet is having a seizure? Try to stay calm. This is hard to do, but using a calm, reassuring quiet voice will comfort your dog or cat. Move any furniture or other objects on which your pet could hurt itself. If you’re unable to move the object, place pillows or wrap blankets between the pet and the object. Slide something soft under your pet’s head, but be sure to keep your hands and face away from his head so that you don’t risk a possible bite. You can gently stroke his hip or side, but position yourself opposite the side of the feet and toenails as the muscle spasms make the feet curl into claws that can gouge or rake your skin. Dim the lights, and keep the environment as quiet as possible by turning off the TV and loud music.

If possible take notes about the seizure so that you can give details to your vet. Jot down the time of day it occurred, the length of each seizure, and the time in between each seizure if they are recurrent. Your vet will also want to know whether your pet urinated or deficated, if the seizure hit suddenly or progressed from mere body twitching, whether your pet regained consciousness, and how long it took before your pet appeared normal again. In addition, you’ll need to figure out whether there were any possible triggering events. These include loud noises such as fireworks, unusual items that were eaten, and excessive playing or exercise.

After the seizure, pets usually appear lost or drugged. This drugged state can last a few minutes to several hours depending on the severity of the seizure. Your pet may respond to you, but do so in a very slow manner. Since seizures are exhausting for your pet, he will probably want to sleep afterwards. It is best to allow him to sleep, but check in on him occasionally without disturbing his rest.

If this is your pet’s first seizure, call your vet as soon as possible. Some vets will want to see if another seizure occurs, while others will perform a variet of blood tests to check for anemia, liver & heart functions, calcium, glucose, & electrolyte levels. Your vet may even run a screen for possible toxins, take x-rays, or perform an electroencephalogram.

The test results may not indicate the specific reason for the seizure. In this case, your vet may wait to see if another seizure occurs or he/she may suggest medications. If the diagnosis is epilepsy, pets have an excellent chance to live a normal life as long as proper medical care and follow-up are provided.

If you discover the cause of the seizure, you may be able to eliminate future seizures by eliminating the seizure’s source. For instance, if the seizure is due to chemcial toxins, make sure your pet remains as free of toxins as possible. Provide human grade food and treats that do not contain chemical preservatives, fillers, or byproducts. Clean your house with chemical-free products. Also, use more natural flea, tick, & heartworm prevention products as some of these products may lower your pet’s seizure threshold and make seizures more difficult to control. Avoid products containing organophosphate insecticides. For safer heartworm prevention, use products containing interceptor and filaribits.

What can you do if your pet’s seizure condition cannot be cured and you realize you and your pet may have to live with the seizures? In the past, the only treatment options available were strong anticonvulsants that could have serious side effects. These still may be your only option. But, more natural approaches have been found to help some pets, either prior to stronger medications or in addition to them so that you may be able to lower the dose. There are a variety of treatment options that include a natural diet, acupuncture, nutritional supplements, homeopathy, herbs, and conventional medications.

As mentioned above, give your pet a human grade diet, free of chemicals and additives. Also, remove other toxins from your pet’s environment. Clean with natural products and use more natural flea, tick, and heartworm prevention measures.

Minimize stress in your pet’s life. Try to avoid sudden changes in his environment, loud noises, and other stressful situations.

You can also try herbs that act as sedatives. These include valerian root, kava, skullcap and oatstraw. Note that when using herbs and supplements, you may need to lower the dosage of other anticonvulsants.

Several supplements appear to help in preventing seizures. Try an antioxidant combination of Vitamin C, E, B-6, and selenium. Your vet can recommend the dosage for your pet. Magnesium and DMG (dimethyl glycine) are other helpful supplements.

Acupuncture is another helpful option which has helped to control seizures in many pets. Sometimes just placing an ear acupuncture tack in a dog’s ear will stop seizures, and this only requires one acupuncture visit.

If the ear tack doesn’t work, gold implants can be placed in different locations under a pet’s head. Or your pet can be treated with traditional chinese acupuncture.

As you can see, there are many natural approaches to treating seizures in pets. These should help your beloved pet to live a normal and comfortable life.

Wednesday, June 18, 2008

Tired of Vet Bills?

Do you make a lot of trips to the vet's office? Do you spend your hard-earned money on vet bills because your dog suffers from chronic ailments? Give your dog or cat the nutrition he needs, and chances are you can spend your money on other things rather than giving it to your veterinarian.

Nutritional deficiencies are often the cause of chronic ailments in pets. Most holistic vets believe that improving a pet's diet will boost health and vitality and often restore chronically ill dogs to health.

Pets need to eat a variety of fresh, whole foods. A balanced, raw, home-made diet provides the nutrients pets need to heal from the inside out.

If you don't have time to feed a home-made diet, buy the best commercial pet food you can find, one made with human-grade ingredients and without chemical preservatives, byproducts, and fillers. (These foods may be difficult to find in grocery stores and pet stores, but are easy to find and purchase on web sites.) Then improve on it. Fresh juice and raw liver are two of the healthiest foods you can add to your pet's diet:

**Fresh Juice (for dogs only):

Use a juicer if you have one. Most dogs love carrot juice, and it contains zinc, vitamin E, beta carotene, copper, and other ingredients that strengthen the immune system. It's best to use organic carrots, and you can add celery, parsley, or apple. Feed directly or mix with your dog's food. Try to feed 1/2 cup juice per 25-30 pounds of weight each day.

**Raw Liver (for both dogs and cats):

Some vets consider liver a miracle food because of its ability to save lives and improve health. Raw beef and chicken liver are rich in amino acids, protein, phosphorous, potassium, copper, and Vitamin A & B-complex.

Feed liver only from organically raised cattle and poultry because the liver stores toxins. You can add raw liver to the fresh juice you make or add it to your dog's food. To help sick pets, feed small amounts of organic calf or chicken liver once or twice per day (one teaspoon per 10 to 20 pounds of body weight).

If your dog has multiple health problems, supplements can also help:

**Digestive Enzymes such as pancreatin and bromelain help to replace enzymes destroyed by heat. Give enzyme supplements between meals.

**Probiotics and Prebiotics contain bacteria that help with digestion and fight infection. They replace bacteria destroyed by an inadequate diet or antibiotics.

**Colostrum and Lactoferrin enhance immune function.

**Vitamins and Minerals are especially helpful when pets have multiple infections. Choose a vitamin/mineral supplement made from whole-food sources. Pets can easily assimilate these.

**Amino Acids are the building blocks of proteins, and proteins are needed to construct every cell in the body.

**Garlic fights infection, helps prevent cancer, expels tapeworms, prevents blood clotting, and makes pets less attractive to parasites such as fleas.

If you provide your pet with the nutrients he needs, you should see a much healthier and happier pet. And maybe that money that used to be spent on vet bills can now go towards a new car, home improvements, a vacation, or even a savings account!

Monday, June 16, 2008

Why Does My Pet Eat Grass?

Are you concerned when your dog or cat eats grass, then throws up afterwards? You’ll probably feel relieved to know that pets eat grass because their bodies need it.

Dogs and cats have been eating grass for a long time. In fact, grass is so popular among dogs that one species, dog grass, is named after them. Dog grass is also known as couch grass and quackweed, and it grows in all but the southern-most states.

You can think of grass as an herbal medicine. It acts as an internal cleanser, expelling excess mucus, bile, and other impurities. It also cleanses the bowels and expels worms. Cereal grasses contain enzymes, vitamins, minerals, and amino acids. Grass also contains chlorophyll, which was used for relieving pain, treating infections, ulcers, skin diseases, and anemia prior to the use of antibiotics.

Some pet owners grow grass specifically to give to their pets to prevent or treat diarrhea, anemia, cataracts, fleas, tumors excessive shedding, and other pet health problems. Pets that are fed grass on a regular basis are less likely to crave outdoor grass. So, if you don’t feel comfortable with your pet eating the grass in your lawn, you may want to grow your own grass for them to eat.

Try growing rye or barley sprouts. These sprouts are preferred over wheat grass because some animals are sensitive to wheat.

Follow these instructions to grow rye or barley grass. Soak one cup organically grown grain in one quart water for 8 to 10 hours. Then drain the container and leave it on its side in a warm place, away from direct sunlight. A tiny white rootlet will sprout from each grain within 24 to 48 hours. Caution: If you don’t see these rootlets, your grain isn’t viable and should be thrown away.

Next, spread the sprouting grain on one inch of moist potting soil or top soil in a plastic garden tray. For drainage create a one inch channel around the soil.

For two days, cover the tray. Then uncover it, and water thoroughly. Place the tray in direct sunlight or under grow lights. Keep the soil moist by watering when needed.

When the grass is 6-8” tall, cut it with scissors or a sharp knife. Place grasses in a ziploc bag, along with a damp paper towel. Be sure to expel air from the bag before sealing. Then store the grass in the refrigerator.

When feeding the grass to your pet, cut or mince it into tiny pieces, or place a small amount in a blender or food processor with other foods. To be sure your cat or dog will accept the grass, begin feeding just a fraction of a teaspoon. Increase the amount gradually to approximately one tablespoon per 50 lbs. of body weight.

Once your pet is given the amount of grass his body needs, you probably won’t be seeing him eating the grass in your lawn. And you can feel relieved knowing that you’re feeding him something that he craves and that his body needs.

Saturday, June 14, 2008

Training Your Pet Parrot

Training your pet parrot can be a rewarding experience, just as training a dog or cat would. The difference with your pet parrot is that it can talk, or actually repeat the words that you taught the bird to speak. It will be much easier if your pet parrot was hand raised prior to its purchase, as compared to the bird being raised by its own parents.

Earning your bird's trust is the first step. Once that is established, work hard to keep it. Do not ever discipline your bird using force, because it will take a long time, if ever, for the bird to trust you again. Whenever you need to discipline a bird, look at it straight in the eye and say 'No' with a stern voice. If it continues to misbehave and start to make loud screams, cover its cage for a while.

Uncover the cage and watch your bird's behavior. Approach your bird slowly while looking straight at the bird's eyes. Slowly slip your hand into the cage and leave it there and watch the bird's reaction. If your parrot attacks you, keep doing this for the next few days. Before long, your parrot will calm down and start to accept you again. You may use a perch or stick, or even a toy, if you do not want to get yourself injured. As you approach the bird with your hand, caress its belly with gentle strokes. Once the bird has gained your trust, it will hop onto your fingers. Use words like 'up' to get your bird perched on your hands.

Once your bird has gained your trust, you are in a great position to start training your bird to talk. Start with simple words like 'hello' or the bird's own name like 'polly'. Slowly use easy to pronounce words and repeat frequently. You can also use training tapes to teach your bird to talk. Cover the cage and play the tape on your recorder or CD player. You can even teach the bird to sing if you repeatedly play a music tape or CD. The best time to do this is early in the morning.

The best period to teach a parrot to talk is between 4 to 6 months of age. Older parrots may take a slightly longer time to master the words. But one thing is for sure, you'll have loads of fun and satisfaction doing it.

Thursday, June 12, 2008

Pet Ear Infections

Is your dog or cat tormented by ear infections? Do you spend time and money at the veterinarian's office trying to bring relief to your beloved pet, only to find that another infection appears over time? If so, you may want to try some more natural approaches to preventing and treating your pet's ear infections.

Dogs and cats have an incredible sense of hearing. To protect their hearing and prevent damage to the ear drum, their ear canals are L-shaped. The problem with this design is that it allows the ears to trap parasites, moisture, debris, and earwax, and any of these can lead to ear infections. Up to 80 percent of ear problems in dogs are linked to allergies, and earmites are often the cause of infection in cats.

The traditional treatment for ear infections is to give antibiotics, antifungal medications or other drugs. The problem with this approach is that drugs upset the normal chemistry inside the ear and can possibly turn a simple infection into a long-term problem. It makes more sense to deal with underlying allergies and strengthen the immune system so that it is able to fight bacteria and other germs BEFORE they cause infection. Also, there are many natural treatments for cleaning the ears and stopping infections without using drugs.

These are the Signs of an Ear Infection:

*Pet shakes head or holds it to one side.

*Pet scratches or rubs ears, or rubs head against furniture or carpet.

*There is a yellow, brown or black discharge in one or both ears.

*Ears smell bad or are tender or red.

The Solutions

*Clean the ears with vinegar - If your pet's ears are filled with brownish-pink wax, there is a good chance that allergies have caused a yeast infection. To clear up yeast infections, clean the ears thoroughly. Veterinarians often recommend using white vinegar, also called acetic acid, because it removes dirt and debris and helps restore a healthy chemical balance in the ears.

Diluted vinegar works well. When using vinegar, pour a small amount into the ear canal, massage the area, then gently wipe the inside of the ear with a cotton ball. Do this once a day until the ear is better.

*Stop infections with pau d'arco - The herb pau d'arco, which comes from the inner bark of a South American tree, is a natural antibiotic that quickly kills fungi and bacteria. At the first sign of infection, mix equal parts pau d'arco tincture and mineral oil and put several drops in your pet's ears. Give the drops two or three times a day for several days.

*Reduce inflammation with vitamin C - The adrenal glands produce a natural steroid that can help reduce inflammation when ears get infected. Giving pets vitamin C can help the adrenal glands work more efficiently. Pets weighing under 15 pounds can take between 100 and 250 milligrams of vitamin C a day. Cats and dogs 15 to 50 pounds can take 250 to 500 milligrams a day, and larger dogs can take 500 milligrams two or three times a day. Vitamin C can cause diarrhea, so you may have to cut back the dose until you find an amount that your pet will tolerate.

*Eliminate toxins with a healthy, all natural diet - Giving your pet a healthy, homemade diet or high quality commercial food that doesn't contain corn, additives or preservatives can greatly reduce the amount of wax that the ears produce, while also helping to boost the immune system.

*Air out the ears - Increasing air circulation inside the ears can control the growth of bacteria, yeast and fungi. Trim or pluck hair inside the ears periodically to allow more air to get inside.

*Strengthen the digestive tract - Supplements such as bromelain and quercetin (with bromelain) can help prevent an allergic response in the gastrointestinal tract, making food allergies less of a problem.

*Stop ear mites with oil - When an infection is caused by ear mites, putting a few drops of almond oil or olive oil in each ear will smother the mites and may allow the infection to heal. You usually need to continue the oil treatments for three to four weeks, putting three to seven drops of oil into the ear canals each day. To help the treatment work more efficiently, clean wax and other debris from the ears before
using oil.

*Try an over-the-counter remedy - One of the best ways to stop ear mites is with over-the-counter products containing pyrethrins. Made from chrysanthemums, pyrethrins are natural insecticides that are very safe to use. Just follow the instructions on the label.

When to Call the Vet

Ear infections can look and smell awful, but they usually affect only the outer part of the ear and aren't too serious. If you're unable to get to the source of the problem (especially if your pet is still scratching a lot), you will want to see your veterinarian to find out what is causing the problem. Vigorous scratching can break blood vessels in the earflap, causing the entire ear to swell like a balloon. This condition is called hematoma and must be drained by a veterinarian to prevent permanent damage.

Other symptoms to watch out for include head tilting, clumsiness, walking in circles or drooping eyes. These are signs of an inner-ear infection, and must be treated by a vet. Your pet will probably need antibiotics to knock out the infection. In addition, your vet may need to drain pus and other fluids from inside the ear!

Tuesday, June 10, 2008

Tips For Toys

Toys are fun both for our dogs and us. Lucky for us there are
endless choices.

But did you know how important toys are for your dogs - puppies

Toys play a great role in the emotional and mental development
of puppies. They also act as solutions for inappropriate
chewing, boredom, and separation anxiety. In fact most dog
trainers recommend that new puppy owners buy lots of toys for
the newest member of the family.

Variety is the spice of life. Most experts recommend buying
different kinds of toys for your dog so that you can discover
which ones he really likes.

You might be surprised with the answers. Berry, my 95 pound
German Shepherd just loves cuddling up his stuffed animals. Who
would have thought!

Trainers and behaviorists recommend that their clients have
three sets of toys.

Primary toys are your dog's favorite. Leave these out for your
dog when your not around. This helps reduce separation anxiety
because your dog associates you leaving with his getting his
favorite toy.

Secondary toys are the toys to have out when you are home. Be
sure to pick up the primary toys.

And finally the third set of toys is used to rotate with the
the first set. Trainers recommend swapping toys every 3 days
or so. This helps keep your dog interested in all his toys.

And always choose toys wisely. Try to buy toys that match your
dog's size. And always make sure there are no dangerous small
pieces that your dog can chew loose and swallow or worse yet -
choke on.

Sunday, June 8, 2008

Frustrated Over High Veterinarian Bills?

Over the past 30 years we have learned so much about taking good care of our pets, right? We feed them “premium” high dollar pets foods, give them tasty packaged treats, vaccinate them yearly, bathe them with expensive shampoos, give them heartworm preventative, use flea collars or flea and tick preventative, brush their teeth, and get yearly checkups with our vets.

Then why are our pets not healthier? Why, instead, are they getting more and more humanlike diseases such as allergies, diabetes, thyroid problems, cancer, and on and on? Why are their coats not so shiny anymore, and they seem to scratch and itch all the time? Why are they so lazy and sleep all the time? Why do they still smell bad, have waxy ears, and bad plaque on their teeth?

The biggest problem points to nutrition, or lack thereof. But I feed my pet a high premium pet food recommended by my vet you might say. Exactly – that, however, is the problem. These so-called premium foods are full of “byproducts”, corn meal, and many other things our pets were never designed to eat nor utilize in their bodies. The preservatives alone are not allowed in human products so how could our pets be expected to digest these toxins without repercussions to their health? The “byproducts” are things that should just be destroyed and not used for anything let alone pet food.

Another problem is exactly the thing you thought were protecting them: yearly vaccinations. This is a huge problem because the rabies vaccine is the one that is mandated by law and it the very worst one for your pets. These yearly vaccinations are not only not necessary but could be a major contributor to the diseases that are plaguing our pets. Vaccinosis is the result of all this over vaccinating and possibly even the culprit behind all the diagnosed diseases resulting in the decline of the health of pets.

Combine poor food, over vaccinating, with the toxins from flea collars, pet toothpaste, packaged treats, and preventative medicines and you’ve got unhealthy, immune suppressed pets that lack the energy to do much more than sleep.

Okay, so now what? Fortunately there are solutions and the best one to start with is food; preferably raw. If that doesn’t appeal to you there are other solutions and answers to help you help your pets on the road to wellness. There are now pet foods on the market that have human grade ingredients without all the toxic preservatives and byproducts. Here are a few to get you started:

There are solutions to protect your pet in lieu of vaccinations and still comply with the law. Holistic veterinarians have alternatives to help you in this area:,

When a pet has a healthy immune system, they won’t smell bad, have waxy ears, and cruddy teeth. There are alternatives to using toxic flea collars and preventative medicines for your pet. Use the resources provided in this article and you will find the best solutions for you and your pets. You can lower your vet bills and your pets can live longer, healthier lives.

Sunday, June 1, 2008

Pets Looking for Humans, Humans Looking for Pets

Attention breeders, livestock owners and pet lovers!

*Pets looking for humans, humans looking for pets!*

A website has been formed to show your classified for
buying or your just wanting to search for a specific
kind of pet. You have plenty of space for writing
what is special about your pet or what it is that
you are looking for in a pet.

You also have the option of leaving a picture on the
site of the pet(s) in whick you are selling. We only
deal with persons in the United States to keep illegal
purchases from being made.

The cost is far lower than any classified ad, and has
the potential to reach far more people than a regular
newspaper would. With being able to use approximately
100 words, you are guaranteed to get attention drawn
to your ad! As a seller, you reserve the right to turn
anyone down who you feel unfit to have your animal.

There is no illegal sales allowed on this site, and
no sales of endangered species!

I believe that the prices are set at a fair and
reasonable level.

I have added a pet rescue page to the site as well.
If you have any names or numbers for me to put to the
list, I am more than happy to put the info on the site.

I am a mother of 2, a wife and a disabled veteran. I wanted to help out with money since I cannot get a 'regular' job. I chose to get into this type of business since I know that there are people all over the Unites States wanting to buy or sell pets and livestock. All animals need love, all humans need love.... bring them together and you have man and his best friend!